The Department of Labor (“DOL”) issued revisions to its Temporary Rule implementing the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”) on Friday, September 11, 2020 (the “Revised Temporary Rule”). The Revised Temporary Rule was issued in response to the decision by U.S. District Judge J. Paul Oetken of the Southern District of New York on August

On Monday, August 3, 2020, U.S District Judge J. Paul Oetken of the Southern District of New York issued a Decision and Order striking down portions of the Department of Labor (“DOL”) regulations implementing the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”). Particularly, the order vacated the following portions of the DOL regulations:

  • The requirement that

Governor Wolf announced that Pennsylvania construction companies will be permitted to resume operations beginning May 1, one week ahead of schedule, provided they adhere to the Administration’s guidance.

The Governor’s guidelines include, among other things, strict social distancing measures (unless employee or public safety requires a deviation); requirements to provide handwashing stations at building

Governor Wolf has unveiled further details about his administration’s plan to reopen the Pennsylvania economy, as hopes persist that the pandemic is losing steam. The administration will use a “three-phase matrix” to determine when counties and/or regions around the Commonwealth are ready to begin easing restrictions on work, congregate settings, and social interactions.

The administration

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (“OSHA”) saw fit to remind employers that it remains illegal to retaliate against workers who report unsafe and unhealthful working conditions, including workplace issues related to COVID-19.

Generally, the whistleblower provision of the Occupational Safety and Health Act, and similar state whistleblower

A recent decision from Pennsylvania’s Commonwealth Court is likely to result in additional burdens on construction firms working with Pennsylvania school districts. In an already tight labor market, the court’s decision in United Union of Roofers, Waterproofers and Allied Workers, Local Union No. 37 v. North Allegheny School District et al could add to the

Effective October 6, 2020, Pennsylvania’s Construction Industry Employee Verification Act will require the use of the E-Verify system for all construction industry employers.

The Act defines the construction industry as those who engage in the erection, reconstruction, demolition, alteration, modification, custom fabrication, building, assembling, site preparation and repair work or maintenance work done on real

As the summer begins to wind down, the first whispers of fall rippling through cool evening breezes are a welcome reminder that school is back in session. That means it’s an opportune time for Pennsylvania’s 500 public school districts and many charter schools to examine their policies governing employee reporting of arrests and convictions and