A recent report from a Pennsylvania Department of Labor & Industry task force describes the economic impact of worker misclassification in Pennsylvania and makes several significant recommendations to the legislature.  These recommendations, if implemented, could dramatically impact how some Pennsylvania employers manage their workforce, particularly those employers in the construction industry.

The report was issued

The General Counsel of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) issued a Guidance Memorandum last week establishing her position that certain players at academic institutions are employees as defined by National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).  If collegiate athletes are protected as “employees” under the NLRA, then these athletes would have rights to organize and join

Last week, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court issued a decision that has broad implications for Pennsylvania employers.  The Court’s decision in In Re: Amazon.com, Inc., which can be read here, established two important differences between Pennsylvania’s overtime law and the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).  These differences are likely to create significant potential

The U.S. Supreme Court declared unconstitutional a California regulation that required agriculture employers to give union organizers access to their premises.  The Court held that by requiring employers to provide such access, the regulation amounted to an unconstitutional taking of private property in violation of the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution.

Below,

The U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) announced the issuance of a Final Rule to clarify the distinction between an employee and an independent contractor under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”).

A worker’s classification under the FLSA determines their entitlement to minimum wage and overtime pay, and determines whether an employer is obligated to maintain

The Department of Labor (“DOL”) issued revisions to its Temporary Rule implementing the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”) on Friday, September 11, 2020 (the “Revised Temporary Rule”). The Revised Temporary Rule was issued in response to the decision by U.S. District Judge J. Paul Oetken of the Southern District of New York on August

On Monday, August 3, 2020, U.S District Judge J. Paul Oetken of the Southern District of New York issued a Decision and Order striking down portions of the Department of Labor (“DOL”) regulations implementing the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”). Particularly, the order vacated the following portions of the DOL regulations:

  • The requirement that

Governor Wolf announced that Pennsylvania construction companies will be permitted to resume operations beginning May 1, one week ahead of schedule, provided they adhere to the Administration’s guidance.

The Governor’s guidelines include, among other things, strict social distancing measures (unless employee or public safety requires a deviation); requirements to provide handwashing stations at building

Governor Wolf has unveiled further details about his administration’s plan to reopen the Pennsylvania economy, as hopes persist that the pandemic is losing steam. The administration will use a “three-phase matrix” to determine when counties and/or regions around the Commonwealth are ready to begin easing restrictions on work, congregate settings, and social interactions.

The administration