The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) recently decided that employees must presumptively be permitted to use their employer’s e-mail system, during non-working time, to communicate with each other about workplace issues, including but not limited to union organizing efforts.
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As readers of this blog surely are aware, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has embarked on a crusade against overbroad social media policies and handbook language. Notably, in a trio of social media reports, the NLRB’s Office of General Counsel suggested that prohibitions on offensive, demeaning, and inappropriate comments or statements that could damage the reputation of the company or its employees are unlawfully vague and could have a chilling effect on employee communications critical of the terms and conditions of their employment. Moreover, the Office of General Counsel expressed its opinion that the inclusion of a Section 7 disclaimer would not save an ambiguous policy. Recent decisions, however, signal that the NLRB has adopted a contrary position.
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