Recently, Adam R. Long, a Member in McNees Wallace & Nurick LLC’s Labor and Employment Law Group prepared a White Paper regarding Wage and Hour Compliance Priorities for 2014.

Employers should conduct regular and comprehensive wage and hour audits that examine all facets of the employer’s pay practices to ensure compliance with the myriad wage and hour laws. That said, we recognize that HR professionals, in-house counsel, and senior management have very limited time and resources to devote to wage and hour compliance. This complimentary white paper discusses specific areas where employers should focus their wage and hour compliance efforts in 2014.
Continue Reading

This post was contributed by Stephen R. Kern, Esq., a Member in the Employee Benefits Practice Group.

The U.S. Department of Labor (the "DOL") has recently enhanced its enforcement activities with respect to group health plans by significantly increasing the number of audits it is conducting. In addition, the DOL’s audit letters contain significant document requests

The Department of Labor (DOL) routinely investigates and audits employers to ensure compliance with a variety of important labor and employment laws. Historically, wage and hour (overtime) compliance under the Fair Labor Standards Act has been the most common subject of the DOL’s enforcement efforts.

Fueled by additional resources, funding and staffing, the DOL is increasing its enforcement efforts both in terms of frequency and scope. This concerning trend means that employers can expect an increase in the number of investigations and that such investigations, once initiated, will cover a broader range of compliance issues and dig deeper into those issues under review. In this regard, our clients are reporting that, in addition to typical wage and hour issues, expanded DOL inquiries as a matter of course now include review of other laws, such as the Family and Medical Leave Act, and even the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. It is also common for DOL investigations to “spread,” resulting in the inquiry ultimately moving into areas other than the initial issue under review.
Continue Reading

For Pennsylvania employers, 2012 was another eventful year in the world of wage and hour law. Even in the absence of new federal legislation, a number of noteworthy developments occurred at both the federal and state levels, confirming that wage and hour compliance remains a moving target for employers. This complimentary white paper summarizes ten of the more significant wage and hour developments in 2012 for Pennsylvania employers
Continue Reading

This post was contributed by Eric N. Athey, Esq., a Member in McNees Wallace & Nurick LLC’s Labor and Employment Practice Group.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act ("PPACA") requires "large employers" (i.e., those regularly employing 50 or more full-time equivalents) to provide "affordable" health coverage of "minimum value" to "full-time employees" and

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“PPACA”), otherwise known as Health Care Reform, is now 2 ½ years old. It narrowly survived its first major legal challenge with the Supreme Court’s decision in July. PPACA survived its second big hurdle with the re-election of President Obama earlier this month. While many of PPACA’s biggest requirements do not take effect until 2014, employers and health plans must be mindful of the flurry of compliance requirements that will soon take effect under the Act. Here is a quick look at the PPACA compliance issues that employers and health plans should be focused on now.
Continue Reading

In the wage and hour realm, even the most knowledgeable Pennsylvania employers often are unaware of potential compliance pitfalls presented by state law. Like the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”), the Pennsylvania Minimum Wage Act (“PMWA”) contains overtime and minimum wage requirements applicable to Pennsylvania employers. The PMWA is similar, but not identical, to the FLSA, and compliance with the FLSA does not always guarantee compliance with this state law.

Earlier this week, a federal court in Pennsylvania highlighted another area where the requirements of the FLSA and PMWA arguably differ, and therefore, could lead to problems for the unwary employer.
Continue Reading

As we approach the halfway point in the year, there are several noteworthy trends in state employment law that you should be aware of in order to proactively address potential high risk areas for your operation and stay compliant with the law. This post provides a summary of some of the hot-button issues affecting employers at the state level.

Employers must stay current on these ever-changing employment law trends, and we will continue to keep you up-to-date on these issues. In addition, we will be hosting our Annual Labor and Employment Law Seminar on June 1, 2012, which will cover labor and employment law developments and trends. For more information about our seminar, including registration information, please visit the events page on our web site at www.mwn.com or follow the links in the post.
Continue Reading

Homicide has consistently been one of the top four causes of work-related fatalities over the past decade, with an average of 590 incidents per year. Shockingly, in 2009, homicide was the leading cause of work-related death for women. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has addressed the hazard of workplace violence from time to time over the past fifteen years in various ways, including publication of specific guidelines for high-risk industries such as late-night retail, health care and social services. However, until now, there was no systematic approach to addressing this serious hazard.

The new OSHA Instruction regarding workplace violence does not change the law pertaining to workplace violence; however, it provides OSHA inspectors with a framework for analyzing this hazard in the workplace and for issuing citations under the general duty clause. Employers in industries with an inherent risk of violence, particularly those who employ workers that are exposed to the “known risk factors,” are well advised to study the OSHA Instruction and implement appropriate abatement measures.
Continue Reading