Employers with more than 100 employees and federal contractors are probably more than familiar with the EEO-1 reporting requirements, but those requirements are about to change. On July 13, 2016, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission published a revised version of a proposed rule to broaden the scope of data collected in the EEO-1 report. Earlier this year, the EEOC issued an initial version of the proposed rule, which would have required additional reporting on each of ten categories of employees and pay information reported by race and gender.  The July 13 version of the rule contained some key changes.

Changes to Proposed Rule

Under the new proposal, the EEOC will require reporting on an employer’s established pay ranges for positions and hours worked. In response to the comments received regarding the initial proposal, the revised proposal proposes moving the due date for filing the required report from September 30, 2017 to March 31, 2018. This change will allow employers to use employee’s W-2 earnings for reporting. Because of the revisions to the proposal, a new 30 day notice and comment period commenced with the release of the new revised proposal in the federal register.

Purpose of Data Collection

EEOC explained that it intends to use pay data for early analysis of discriminatory complaints. Investigators will examine the data for pay disparities and perform statistical analyses, yet to be determined in order to investigate whether compensation discrimination appears likely. EEOC has further stated that it will compare periodic reports on pay disparities by gender and race based on the data. Finally, the agency will use the data to enhance its support for training programs by, among other things, providing supporting evidence for training programs.

What Should I Do Now

EEOC actually pays attention to the comments it receives as is evidenced by the new revised proposed rule. We strongly encourage employers to make comments on the hardships the proposed revised rule would create. EEOC has remained silent on how it will account for the merit based non-discriminatory factors that could lead to differences in pay in the same job category. This is an issue we suggest employers should press heavily in their comments. Tenure, skill sets and even the broad nature of the job categories themselves can be pivotal in determining wage differences. Stay tuned, we will likely see more changes when the final rule is published.

 

A national home health care provider, doing business in York Pennsylvania as Epic Health Services, was recently issued a citation and significant fine by The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in connection with an assault of an employee by a client.

Even a sanitized version of the facts is disturbing. The employer provides health care and therapy services to clients in their homes. One of the employer’s home health workers was sexually assaulted by a client of the employer while working in the client’s home. Prior to this incident, another employee had specifically warned the employer about sexual assaults. In addition, the employer has received numerous prior reports of verbal, physical and sexual assaults directed toward employees, and of a concern that an employee was working in a home where domestic violence occurred.

Following a complaint by the assaulted employee, and resulting investigation, OSHA determined that the employer failed to adequately protect its employees from the dangers of workplace violence. More specifically, OSHA concluded that Epic Health exposed employees to risk of physical assault while provided home health care to clients and support services to family members, without any system in place for reporting or addressing threats or incidents of violence. In its official news release for this case, OSHA stated: “Epic Health Services failed to protect its employee from life-threatening hazards of workplace violence and failed to provide an effective workplace violence prevention program.”

Obviously, the fact that the employer ignored prior employee reports of hazards and the potential for violence at outside work locations (in clients’ homes) was considered significant in terms of OSHA’s conclusion that the employer failed to adequately protect its workers and provide a safe workplace.

As a result, the employer was cited for a “willful” violation for failing to maintain a safe workplace under OSHA’s General Duty Clause, which is a catch-all type provision that is applied when the issue under consideration is not covered by a specific regulation, as well as a second citation for several “other than serious” recordkeeping violations. In addition, the employer was hit with hefty fines totaling $98,000.00 (including the current maximum $70,000 fine for the willful violation plus an additional $28,000 for the recordkeeping violations).

In the primary citation, OSHA also stated a number of suggested abatement measures that the employer was encouraged to implement in an effort to address workplace violence issues and avoid future similar violations, including:

  • A written, comprehensive workplace violence prevention program;
  • A workplace violence hazard assessment and security procedures for each new client;
  • Procedures to control workplace violence such as a worker’s right to refuse to provide services in a clearly hazardous situation without fear of retaliation;
  • A workplace violence training program;
  • Procedures to be taken in the event of a violent incident in the workplace, including incident reports and investigations; and
  • A system for employees to report all instances of workplace violence, regardless of severity.

As with any OSHA citation, Epic Health Services has 15 days to request a conference with OSHA’s area director to discuss the findings and proposed penalties or file a formal contest with before the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission to challenge the findings and penalties.

There are many lessons that the prudent employer can take from this case, including:

  • Always be on the lookout for and continuously assess safety and health risks and hazards in the workplace;
  • Keep your eyes and ears open, and listen to and consider legitimate employee concerns and complaints;
  • Don’t ignore, and apply safety programs to, outside/remote work locations;
  • Address safety risks in a timely manner;
  • Recognize that it’s an employer’s responsibly to assess risks and keep employees safe at work within established standards, even with respect to risks, hazards and dangers created by non-employees/third parties; and
  • Maintain, review and update as necessary appropriate and comprehensive policies and procedures addressing workplace safety.

All employers should be attentive to and serious about workplace safety issues, particularly considering OSHA’s ongoing aggressive enforcement efforts and the potential for significant liability (including that the already substantial maximum penalty amounts are expected to be significantly increased in the near future).   Don’t be the unprepared employer that is faced with the likely unfavorable and costly outcome of an unexpected OSHA investigation. Instead, take a proactive approach, review safety programs and overall OSHA compliance status now – before an investigator is at your door – and significantly reduce your risk of liability.

Please feel free to call any member of our Labor and Employment Law Practice Group if you have any questions about this post and for further guidance regarding OSHA compliance and workplace safety issues.