Just over thirty years ago, Congress passed the Immigration Reform and Control Act (“the Act”). It requires that employers verify the identity and work authorization of the people they hire. It also mandates that such verification be done on a form designated by the Attorney General. We know that form as the I-9. From time to time, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) issues revised versions of the I-9. It did so again last November.

As we outlined in our original blog post, the new version, found here, contains a few modifications. First, it is designed to be more computer-friendly, with dropdown lists, calendars for filling in dates, and on-screen instructions – all useful in eliminating common errors discovered during audits. Additionally, it has prompts to ensure information is entered correctly, the ability to have multiple preparers, a dedicated area for additional information, and a supplemental page for the preparer. Finally, the new version changes Section 1. Instead of asking for “other names used” by the employee, it asks for “other last names used.”

While employers had the option to start using the new version immediately, they are required to start using the new version no later than January 22, 2017. On the lower left corner of the form, you will see that the form has a revision date of “11/14/2016 N.” The “N” denotes that after the effective date of the form, previous versions are no longer valid, and employers cannot use them to satisfy the requirements of the Act. In its news release about the update, the USCIS indicated that the new Form I-9 will become effective on January 22, 2017.

So, if you have yet to make the switch, now is the time. Keep in mind, however, that despite the implementation of the new form, employers must continue to comply with existing rules for storage and retention with respect to all previously completed forms.

Earlier in the year, we reported on a temporary injunction issued by a federal district court Judge in Texas.  The injunction prevented the Department of Labor from enforcing the so-called “persuader rule.”  The rule sought to require all employers, consultants, and lawyers to disclose and report labor relations services, including  fee arrangements and a description of the services provided to employers by attorneys and consultants.

After issuance of the temporary injunction, the federal government filed a motion to seeking to set aside the Judge’s order in an effort to clear the way for enforcement of the rule.  The National Federation of Independent Business, which sought the temporary injunction on behalf of employers, filed its own motion to make the injunction permanent.

On November 16, 2016, the Court denied the government’s motion and granted the National Federation of Independent Business’s, permanently prohibiting the federal government from enforcing the persuader rule.  This is a big win for employers everywhere as they will not face consequences for failing to disclose the labor relations advice given by their consultants and attorneys.

The government has appealed, but the Fifth Circuit is not expected to consider the case before the end of President Obama’s term in January.  It is expected that President-elect Trump’s administration will either reverse the persuader rule outright or allow it to die by withdrawing the appeal.  We will continue to monitor the issue and report any further developments here.

McNees recently issued an Employer Alert regarding the U.S. Department of Labor’s new Fair Labor Standards Act regulations, which significantly change the FLSA’s white collar overtime exemptions.  You can review the Employer Alert by clicking here.

Please feel free to reach out to any member of the McNees Labor and Employment Team to discuss the new regulations and strategies for effectively implementing the changes in your organization.